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IN THE GARDEN: Is it partial or full sun?

Keep reading for a suet cake recipe to feed your feathered friends.

As you decide which vegetables to plant and where, you might read on the seed packet or plant description: “requires full sunlight” or “does well in partial sunlight." Partial sunlight, or often partial shade, is defined as 3-6 hours of direct sunlight. Full sunlight means a minimum of 6 hours of sunlight, generally 8-10 hours of direct sun required.

If you have a tree or a house close to your gardening area, check if shadows will be on the garden during the day. Before you plant, walk out to your gardening area every 3-4 hours during the day. Take note if a shadow is cast over the area and for how long. This will let you know whether certain areas of your garden will be in partial or full sunlight.

GARDEN PREP CHECKLIST

  1. Drainage
  2. Light (full or partial)
  3. Test soil nutrients every 2-3 years
  4. Fertilizer
  5. Rocks and weeds removed
  6. Soil loosened
  7. Plenty of mulch on hand
  8. Accessible water supply
  9. Seeds or transplants
  10. Plant markers (labels)

PARTIAL-SHADE VEGETABLES

A few to consider are beet, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrot, collard, kale, lettuce, mustard, parsley, radish, spinach, and turnip.

FULL-SUN VEGETABLES

These vegetables require full sunlight: beans, broccoli, cantaloup, cauliflower, cucumber, eggplant, okra, peas, peppers, potatoes, pumpkin, squash, tomatoes, and watermelon.

FEBRUARY PLANTINGS

Asparagus, beets, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower (transplant), Swiss chard, collards, sweet corn (mid- or late February) kohlrabi, lettuces, mustard, onion (plants), parsley, English peas, potatoes (mid-February), radishes, and turnips.

SUET RECIPE

“It is fun to make, and our local birds just love it!” — Sue Kersey

  • 1 cup crunchy peanut butter
  • 1 cup lard
  • 2 cups quick-cook oats
  • 2 cups cornmeal
  • 1 cup flour

Melt the lard and peanut butter in a microwave or over low heat. Stir in the remaining ingredients and pour the mixture into square freezer containers about ½-inch thick to fit your suet baskets. Store it in the freezer until you are ready to put it in a suet basket. This makes about 6 suet cakes.

Make sure to keep your avian watering holes fresh and full.

Till next time. Keep your souls and soles in your garden! Remember the True Master Gardener: Jesus said, “I am the vine; my Father is the Gardener.” John 15:1

Contact Martelle Luedecke at 512-769-3179 or luedeckephotography@gmail.com or Bill Luedecke at 512-577-1463 or bill@texasland.net.

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