Browse 101 News for more articles like this.

Eco-Therapy Retreat to Show Nature’s Supportive Role in Grieving Process

‘A Life Less Lonely: Bringing Nature into Healing, Grief, and Loss’ is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at Candlelight Ranch, 6408 Muleshoe Bend Trail off RR 1431 about 20 miles east of Marble Falls. The one-day retreat is free, but there is a $25 refundable deposit.

MARBLE FALLS — Grieving is a very real and important process when we lose a loved one. Many of us, however, don’t give our grief the time and space it needs or we just don’t know that we need to grieve.

Jessamyn Putnam of Putnam Cares funeral homes said her business hosted a grief support group for a number of years in Kingsland. It started well, but, over the years, the numbers dwindled until no one showed up. She wondered if there was different way to approach grief.

“Our need for grief therapy hasn’t changed, but it’s knowing that we need it or what it looks like,” she said.

Putnam and licensed therapist Amy Sugeno have teamed up to offer a new type of grief therapy program: “A Life Less Lonely: Bringing Nature into Healing, Grief, and Loss.”

The eco-therapy group meets 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at Candlelight Ranch, 6408 Muleshoe Bend Trail off RR 1431 about 20 miles east of Marble Falls. The one-day retreat is free, but there is a $25 refundable deposit.

“Amy is leading it,” Putnam said. “She has a tremendous amount of experience in eco-therapy.”

The retreat is open to adults who have experienced loss.

Sugeno spent 16 years as a wildlife biologist during which she saw the healing and transformative power of nature on people. She then became a social worker and a therapist and has offered eco-therapy to clients for about a decade.

She has also lectured on eco-therapy at conferences and universities as well as in community groups.

During the retreat at Candlelight Ranch, people will:

• learn how nature affects the brain and improves mental health;

• learn how nature can support a person during difficult times;

• try activities designed to help people move through good and bad days;

• be part of a supportive group;

• have individual time for contemplation;

• and learn about mindfulness in nature.

Research has shown that just spending more time in nature can help with a person’s mental and emotional well-being. Some physicians are even “prescribing” time in nature for patients suffering from a range of ailments, including anxiety, depression, and stress.

There are a limited number of spots Oct. 6 — organizers might offer more retreats in the future — so register now by contacting Putnam at (830) 798-8413 or staff@cremationadvocates.net.

YOUTH GRIEF PROGRAMS

For parents or guardians of children who have lost someone close to them, Camp Agape offers summer bereavement camps for ages 7-12. Go to campagapetexas.org for more information on its programs.

daniel@thepicayune.com

Find more articles like this in 101 News

Leave a reply

Top